Discount Sniper Rifle Scopes

Looking for the best deal on scopes for your sniper rifle? We're here to help you find them. We hunt down great deals on scopes for any long range hunting rifle. We find deals on scopes from top brands like Nikon, Leupold, Burris, and Bushnell. We also have great articles to help you find the sniper scope just right for your shooting style.

Featured Rifle Scopes

ZOS 10 40x60 E SF R6 Rifle Scope Optics exact shooting aid Black ws1130md1244pm
ZOS 10 40x60 E SF R6 Rifle Scope Optics exact shooting aid Black ws1130md1244pm
Paypal   US $105.00
ZOS 10 40x60 E SF R6 Rifle Scope Optics exact shooting aid Black ws1130md1244pm

Choosing a Sniper Rifle Scope

A sniper rifle scope could basically be called a small and specialized telescope that attaches to a rifle and magnifies and enhances the image of a shooter's target. Most sniper rifle scopes are used by law enforcement and military personnel, but many civilians also put the scopes to good use. Big game hunting, varmint shooting and target range shooting all require the right kind of sniper rifle scope.

Sniper rifle scopes are very different from the "normal" scopes you find on most rifles. The sniper scopes have variable adjustments that take into account the distance to the target, wind speed, light conditions and many other factors. They have complex inner components that determine its shooting accuracy.

There's more to consider when you're thinking of buying a sniper rifle scope than the accuracy and/or features of the scope's mechanical parts. If you shoot a gun with a heavy recoil you will need a tube - or scope body - that can absorb the impact of heavy recoil during shooting and remain in place, allowing you to stay on target and deliver a second shot if necessary.

A sniper rifle scope's physical features are another important thing to consider. If you need to travel long distances by foot, you'll want a scope that is lighter and less bulky than larger scopes that never find their way off the shooting range. The scope that is perfect for long range shooting just won't perform well in a situation that requires quick target acquisition. A more compact design is necessary for close range or urban sniping. These types of sniper rifle scopes are called tactical scopes.

Durability is an important issue as well, you should look for sniper rifle scopes that are guaranteed to be waterproof, fogproof and shockproof. Condensation on a scope's lenses, whether from rain, fog or the shooter's breath, can completely destroy image quality and make any shot impossible. A sniper rifle scope also needs to stand up to the rigors of the field and without shockproof construction, the slightest bump can ruin all the settings you've made the scope.

As you can see, choosing the right scope to fit your needs involves a lot of factors ranging all the way from mechanics and construction to image quality and magnification. But as long as you know the kind of terrain you'll be shooting in and the type of shots you'll most often be taking, choosing the right sniper rifle scope should not be too difficult.

Shooting With A Rifle Scope

Using a scope on a rifle makes for much more accurate shooting - if you know how to choose one and use one. All the high powered magnification and high tech optics won't help you hit your target if you don't know how to make the best use of your scope's qualities.

A scope not only improves your aim, it can help you to identify your target. If you're shooting deer in brush it's easy to mistake branches for antlers. If your hunting license is buck only this is a mistake you don't want to make. It's true that using binoculars also make target identification easier, but in the time it takes for you to check your target, put down your binoculars, pick up and take aim with your rifle, your prey can be long gone or safely hidden in the brush.

In the past, if a fast shot was required, most rifle users depended on the "peep" sight or standard iron sights - but today's tactical rifle scopes offer a wider field of view and better eye relief to make quick shooting clean and easy. Don't let the need for fast shots scare you away from the accuracy a good scope can give you.

Many rifle shooters think that when it comes to a scope's magnification, bigger is always better. This is rarely true. If the majority of your shots are at short to mid range, an extremely high powered scope is overkill. High magnification means every bit of unsteadiness in your grip and aim will be also be magnified, throwing your shot way off. Too high of magnification can also lead you to take shots you really know you shouldn't - ending in a missed shot or a wounded animal that you have to track down.

A rifle scope's objective - or forward lens - is another feature to be aware of. A larger objective can gather more light, which increases brightness and makes shooting in lower light conditions more accurate. The downside of larger objectives is that the scope has to be mounted higher on the gun. This creates a higher line of sight, which is more awkward to aim with and can make your rifle top heavy.

Rifle scopes are available in almost any configuration of size and power. They also come in variable or fixed power models. It will take experience for you to know which option works better for you. A point to keep in mind - on a variable scope the point of impact will usually change depending on the magnification setting. This isn't an issue with a fixed power scope, but if you've practiced with a variable and know how it responds at different magnifications, you can easily adjust.

Fixed power scopes are less expensive than variable power scopes. But an experienced shooter will tell you  if you can't afford a higher quality variable scope, don't buy a cheap one. They won't adjust well or hold the point of impact. A fixed power rifle scope at the same price will be much more reliable and accurate.